My Booking

The Old Pear Tree B&B

A143 Bury-Haverhill Road Whepstead, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP29 4UD, United Kingdom
Self Assessed

Bury St Edmunds Festival May 19 - 28 2017

Every Year the Bury Festival gets better and better.

In 2017 it includes James Galway, Rick Wakeman and a huge selection of national and local performers.

https://www.buryfestival.co.uk/

St Edmunds Bury Cathedral

St Edmunds Bury Cathedral

St Edmunds Bury Cathedral is the cathedral for the Church of England's Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich.  There are twenty-six wolves in Bury St Edmunds. Two are at the Cathedral, with others nearby. You are welcome to discover and enjoy the wonderful, unique sculptures of the Bury St Edmunds Wolf Trail. 

The Abbey

The Abbey

The Abbey of Bury St Edmunds was once among the richest Benedictine monasteries in England, until the Dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. It is in the town that grew up around it, Bury St Edmunds in the county of Suffolk, England. It was a centre of pilgrimage as the burial place of the Anglo-Saxon martyr-king Saint Edmund, killed by the Great Heathen Army of Danes in 869. The ruins of the abbey church and most other buildings are merely rubble cores, but two very large medieval gatehouses survive, as well as two secondary medieval churches built within the abbey complex.

Pakenham Watermill

Pakenham Watermill

The parish of Pakenham is unique in Britain in having both a working watermill and a working windmill. The 18th century watermill, the last working watermill in Suffolk and now owned by the Suffolk Building Preservation Trust, is on a Domesday site. Here, for almost a thousand years, millers have been using the simple technology of water power to produce stone-ground wholemeal flour from locally-grown wheat. The mill is maintained and operated by a team of dedicated volunteers who continue the tradition.

West Stow Country Park and Anglo-Saxon Village

West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village is both an archaeological site and an open-air museum located near to West Stow in Suffolk, eastern England. Evidence for intermittent human habitation at the site stretches from the Mesolithic through the Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age and Romano-British period, but it is best known for the small village that existed on the site between the mid-5th century and the early 7th century CE, during the early Anglo-Saxon period. During this time, around 70 sunken-featured buildings were constructed on the site, along with 8 halls and a number of other features. Subsequently abandoned, the area became farmland in the Late Medieval.

 
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